• Thursday Day at the Range

    Ruger BSR9

    Today’s Thursday Day at the Range was, shall we say, both interesting and a bit humbling. After posting the “Five Best” 1911 targets below, this week’s targets weren’t nearly so impressive. That’s the humbling part. The interesting part is the contrast between this Ruger BSR9 (“B” for black slide) and the SR9 from a few weeks ago. The recent SR9 shoot was somewhat disconcerting because the front sight decided to attempt a walkabout. Needless to say, the accuracy results were somewhat compromised by a sight attempting to escape its dovetail. While contemplating a remedy for that pistol, which has a stainless bare finish slide, I decided to break out another SR9,…

  • Thursday Day at the Range

    .30 Luger Ruger P89

      This week’s Thursday Day at the Range includes a reshoot of the .30 Luger Ruger P89. If you recall from the earlier Thursday Day at the Range report, Ruger offered a .30 Luger conversion kit for the 9x19mm P89 pistol. I was reminded at that time the Ruger actually offered a two-caliber version of the P89, the “P89X.” The .30 Luger barrel and recoil spring assembly had their own little recesses in the plastic pistol case. This particular setup was a separate kit, apparently offered by Ruger to use up extra .30 Luger ensembles. Our previous experience with the ersatz P89X involved adapting a P89DC (decocking) slide to a P89.…

  • Thursday Day at the Range

    Ruger P91DAO

    Today’s Thursday Day at the Range is brought to you courtesy of two Thursday Days at the Range ago, a shoot saved for a day when I could not make it to the range. You see, today instead of the customary range session I got the first fitting for my new hearing aids. Ironic, no? Well, you might ask, what about the gun? Those who are regular readers of these Thursday Day at the Range reports will recall the Ruger P89 and P89X sessions. During the discussion of these Rugers the comment was made, “I have a P91DAO; have you ever had one?” The P91 is, for practical purposes, the…

  • Thursday Day at the Range

    .45 ACP CDR SR1911

    This week’s Thursday Day at the Range is a back-to-the-.45-SR1911 Day. Ruger’s SR1911 Series is a refreshingly direct rendition of the classic M1911. You’ll find no extraneous ornamentation – at least if you look past the Doug Koening Custom Shop Special, that is. This time we’re reshooting the steel .45 ACP CDR SR1911. Why? Well, we had good luck improving the accuracy of another M1911 pistol by upgrading the stocks. So, when we added this set of beautiful stocks from Bill Griffith to my steel .45 Ruger CDR, we wondered if history would repeat itself. Well, doggone it, it sure did! If you were to scroll down to the earlier report on…

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    In my Back Yard – Tulle Fusil de Grenadier

    In My Back Yard: Tulle Fusil de Grenadier BY SCOTT DUFF One of the most interesting firearms I have had the opportunity to own is a Tulle Fusil de Grenadier. As a lifetime history buff, I knew from a young age that Forbes Road, the 18th century road from Fort Ligonier to Fort Duquesne, passed about two miles south of my home. As a boy it never entered my mind that I would one day own a French musket that may have been carried along Forbes Road. The French & Indian War began in South Western Pennsylvania at what is now known as Jumonville Glen. In May 1754, 22-year old Lt. Col.…

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    My Favorite Garands – Part 1 of 2

    My Favorite Garands – Part 1 of 2 If you have followed my writings, you know that I advocate a theme to collecting.  As an example, my theme for collecting World War II era Springfield Armory M1 rifles is to have one of each year from 1939 through 1945.  I also have a theme with my entire US martial arms collection.  I collect by war usage: French and Indian War, American Revolution, Seminole Wars, Mexican War, Civil War, Indian Wars, Spanish American War, World War I, World War II, and Korean War.  I prefer firearms that were most typical of those used by the average soldier, cavalry man, or paratrooper. …

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    My Favorite M1911A1 Pistol

    My Favorite M1911A1 Pistol By Scott Duff This post is my third about my favorite World War II U.S arms.  The first was, of course, about the M1 Garand rifle.  The second was about the M1 and M1A1 carbines.  This one is about my M1911A1 pistol.   The following paragraph is repeated from my first story in Scott & Walt’s Gun Tales. As a researcher and serious student of American history I like comparative technological study.  Therefore, my theme for World War II focuses on the year 1943.  By 1943 the primary US arms were well developed and production was at or nearing its peak.  Americans were engaged in combat against…

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    We Wish They Could Talk – And Sometimes They Do – Part 2

    We Wish They Could Talk – And Sometimes They Do – Part 2 By Scott Duff Records of some serial numbered older US weapons from the Civil War through the early 20th century are more prevalent in the National Archives than are World War II arms.  If you have the time and money and live near the Archives it can be a gold mine for ID’d small arms.  Many years ago Frank Mallory began a business named Springfield Research Services (SRS) that conducted exactly that type of research.  Frank compiled his research at the National Archives into a series of books listing small arms by model, serial number and document…

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    A 4th of July Tribute Part 2

    A 4th of July Tribute Part 2 John MacIlduff My great, great, great, great, great Grandfather, John MacIlduff, fought in the American Revolution.  Not in well-known battles fought along the eastern seaboard, but in skirmishes with Indians whom the British had induced to attack settlers on the western side of the Appalachian Mountains.  He served as a private in Captain Thomas Morton’s Company of Westmoreland County Frontier Rangers between 1778 and 1783.  It is unlikely that these Rangers were armed with military muskets such as the Model 1763.  It is more probable that their weapons consisted of a variety of personal rifles or smooth bore hunting flintlocks, as well as…

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    A 4th of July Tribute Part 1

    A 4th of July Tribute Part 1 Each year on the 4th of July, I take some time away from cookouts, fireworks, and my family to spend a few moments with my favorite firearm.  I sit alone in my gunroom, reflecting upon the one piece in my collection that for me most embodies Independence Day.  It doesn’t have a gas cylinder, it isn’t even Parkerized.  It isn’t a mint, perfect example; in fact it is probably the worst condition piece in my collection.  It is a well-used Model 1763 Charleville flintlock musket, which features a branded “U STATES” surcharge and three sets of initials carved into the stock.  Both sling…